"Short stories are the deep, encoded crystallizations of all human knowledge."

George Saunders, who recommended a reading list for space aliens hoping to understand humans

"Most writers use material in the way a coyote eats a mouse—impersonally, pragmatically, with neither pity nor loathing, to fulfill a need."

Michelle Huneven on writers fictionalizing real life


by incidentalcomics:
Literary Consolation Prizes (for the NY Times Book Review)

by incidentalcomics:

Literary Consolation Prizes (for the NY Times Book Review)

(via crownpublishing)

The Atlantic feature on a 2013 Innovations in Reading Prize Winner.

Will Alexander, whose Goblin Secrets won a 2012 National Book Award, joined Google’s Connected Classroom to speak with Time for Kids and our summer BookUp students.

Join the next Hangout featuring 2013 National Book Award winner Gene Luen Yang.

TOMORROW (7/29) at 10 AM: Join a Google Hangout with Will Alexander, Time for Kids, Google’s Connected Classrooms, and our BookUp students!

Happy Birthday to 2011 NBF Distinguished Contribution to American Letters recipient John Ashbery.

(Source: vimeo.com)

#tbt - Video of Maxine Hong Kingston, who will be honored this year with a National Medals of Arts. Kingston received the National Book Foundation’s lifetime achievement award for her Distinguished Contribution to American Letters in 2008.
More: www.nationalbook.org/amerletters_2008_kingston.html

(Source: vimeo.com)

Congratuations to our 2007 National Book Award Fiction Finalist Joshua Ferris and our 2006 National Book Award Fiction Winner Richard Powers for being among the first Americans longlisted for the Man Booker Prize.

Norman Mailer’s Picasso-inspired illustrations.

fairytalesfor20somethings:

I just started teaching with BookUp, National Book Foundation's non-profit that puts writers into after school and summer programs to basically just have fun with reading. It is the coolest thing ever.

I had my first session with the soon-to-be fifth graders at the Cross Island YMCA in Hollis, Queens, on Tuesday. I read some fairy tales from Alice in Tumblr-land and gave the group a sneak peak behind my super-secret writing process. Then they came up with these kickass fairy tales!

(Shivery!)

(via timmanleytimmanley)

lastnightsreading:

Tiphanie Yanique at BookCourt, 7/21/14



Tiphanie was an NBF  5 Under 35 Honoree in 2010 for How to Escape from a Leper Colony. Her new novel, Land of Love and Drowning, is out now!

lastnightsreading:

Tiphanie Yanique at BookCourt, 7/21/14

Tiphanie was an NBF 5 Under 35 Honoree in 2010 for How to Escape from a Leper Colony. Her new novel, Land of Love and Drowning, is out now!

"Bookplates first appeared in the 1480s with the book–owner’s coat of arms. In America, people started using them as early as 1680 and in greater numbers in the 1730s. And by the end of the nineteenth century, when the Arts and Crafts Movement was challenging the excessive decoration of the earlier Victorian taste, bookplate collecting became a fashionable pursuit, one that would remain so until World War II."

Via the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art Blog, the graphic contributions of American artists to the history of the bookplate.

Happy birthday, Ernest Hemingway!

Here’s a collection of photographs of the iconic writer with the animals he loved.

"My favorite place to read is in a dark bar mid-day. Although I can read almost anywhere, we’re each allowed our preferences and mine is so."

— Juan Vidal, cultural critic and 1/3 of Rhema Soul, “A Shot And A Book: How To Read In Bars” (via NPR)